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Poster: leftwinger57 Date: Jun 12, 2014 9:32am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: racks of axes

This is kind of interesting and does tie in w/my prior post. For Jerry himself the going rap was he just did not like any guitar made off the shelf no matter the brand. We all know the evolution laid out by Steve Parrish but the white Travis Dean is one I personally never liked both tone and looks wise. ALL the natural wood Irwin models were absolute works of art. Now why do some need a rack full and others can get by w/ only one there are many factors. Specific songs require a certain sound that lets say only a Rickenbacher can achieve or songs in different tunings and especially playing slide you usually change to a different guitar. I was plenty happy when Alvin Lee only played Big Red or Jimi on his concert white Strat or Townsend in the begining w/ the red S.G. Later on when many pros had their own signature line they must showcase those guitars and only those.

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Poster: mcglone Date: Jun 14, 2014 7:59pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: racks of axes

lest we forget.

Attachment: archive_martin_d18.jpg

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Poster: wisconsindead Date: Jun 16, 2014 2:08pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: racks of axes

Steve Kimock is the only guitarist I've seen in concert who changes guitars a lot. Bobby actually does switch guitars a lot with Ratdog now as well. But that was rare for the GD days.

Stratocaster is right. Most of the sound which defines Phil or Jerry comes from how they play the instrument. I play bass and find this to be the case as well. Getting the small nuances is where you need the correct speakers, amps, strings, guitar etc...

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Poster: stratocaster Date: Jun 12, 2014 2:06pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: racks of axes

Guitar players all have preferences for design and tone, Garcia was very persnickey, he wanted certain aspects of stock guitars he liked built into a custom job...the biggest reason I can see to have a rack of guitars is if they are in different tunings, outside of that, there really isn't any need to have a rack of guitars on stage from a practical point of view...when I play out, I have my main guitar and sometimes,if it is a bigger gig, I will bring a backup guitar and it will sit in the case...I am a firm believer that tone comes from the fingertips, listen to the OOOPS Shows from 1981, even on borrowed instruments, they still sounded like themselves...

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Poster: billydlions Date: Jun 12, 2014 2:39pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: racks of axes

Good point about 10-16. I've always wondered if they had any of their equipment- pedals or amps or was the borrowed equipment the same brand? You would never know they weren't using their normal gear.

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Poster: ColdRain108 Date: Jun 12, 2014 1:44pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: racks of axes

my experience with Stills, it seemed more like a part of his "schtick" to have a new guitar for every song - and a stage boy at his beck and call. Perhaps just showing off his collection since the sound wasn't really good enough to discern any real tonal differences in the audience - BTW it was a stinky show to say the least, just plain old bad, funny as I had seen them before and they were freakin great, but the last time I saw them they were down right horrible, worse than any bad Dead show I ever saw.

The times I saw the Who I did see Pete thrash one guitar and then grab a new one, but I don't recall him having a huge rack of them on the stage. The gigs where the guitar was the center point it seemed like the player had one guitar that they would use all night. When the group was more Schtick oriented then multiple guitars would be employed.

I have seen a few bar bands where the guys have more money than talent and are really in it to show off their PRS collections.

Jerry had guitars that were like no others, made specifically for him - not just a stenciled name on the headstock. The Irvin's are a hybrid of a set neck, angled headstock Les Paul style combined with 25.5" scale length of a Strat. Trying to avoid the intonation short comings of each. Add to that the onboard pre-amp stuff and you won't be able to find anything like that at Guitar Center. Especially back in the 70's and 80's, a slack time in American guitar building unless the guitar had a pointy headstock. Jerry didn't play the Beans for very long.

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Poster: Sansloy Date: Jun 13, 2014 6:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: racks of axes

I recall Pete T. having each Les Paul marked with a large number, kind of emphasizing the interchangeability of the guitars. For Cheap Trick's Rick Nielsen, constantly swapping out guitars is his shtick - it's part of the show.

I've always been a little surprised to see Jerry with the Travis Bean guitars, although there was a short period of time where all the Rolling Stones used them.